Monday, March 28, 2016

Mischief Managed

My wonderful Gilmore loom needed a bit of TLC this weekend.  The front and back tie-on bars are attached to the loom via webbing that has metal fasteners.  These metal fasters have rough edges that have created some scratches on both my front and back beams.  This will not do at all!  I like my looms to stay in good condition so I decided to do a bit of clean up.


The beams have been sanded with very fine sand paper to remove the scratches on them.  A bit of the patina was sanded off in the process, couldn't be helped.  Bought some Watco lacquer which is what Gilmore uses to finish the wood on their looms.  Two coats have been applied.  First coat went on last night and today I applied the second coat.  Tomorrow I will buff the beams with 0000 steel wool and wax them with Johnson's Paste Wax.  Plan on placing them back on the loom and letting them cure for a week before I put another warp on.

As for the metal fasteners I will cover them with some thin felt stick on pads to protect the beams from new damage.  Hopefully this solution will manage the mischief my loom has gotten itself into.



In case you are wondering about the oil paintings in the background...  The Navaho boy was painted by my Great-Uncle back in the seventies.  This painting was hung in my Grandparent's resort cabin for years, it was willed to me.  


The second painting was painted by me several years ago.   It is the Seul Choix Light in Michigan, built in 1892 and is still active.



This lighthouse was also painted by me, although it is a composite piece not an actual existing light.



A lovely bouquet of spring tulips brings a bit of cheer to our home.

Back to the looms!

Happy Weaving.
Please visit my  Etsy shop  --  Thistle Rose Weaving by clicking here:



Friday, March 11, 2016

Busy With Bumberet


Bumberet has been on many weavers looms lately and I thought it looked like a good weaving draft to stash bust in my studio.  Although it takes a bit of work to warp the end result was worth the effort and time to get it on the loom.


Isn't fun to see how different each towel looks with a simple weft change?


Pepper at her favorite window keeping watch over the back yard. 

Back to the looms!

Happy Weaving.
Please visit my  Etsy shop  --  Thistle Rose Weaving by clicking here:



Sunday, February 28, 2016

Supervised Weaving



Miss Pepper has finally grown into her supervisory role in my weaving studio.  I work and she sleeps with an occasional break for throwing her ball or playing with one of her many squeaky toys.  Although we still miss our beloved Old English Sheepdog Mr. Sam Wise Gamgee - Peps has adjusted to her new role admirably.


I used the 8 shaft Stickler pattern of Octogons to weave some cotlin towels.  The traditional Swedish colors of grey, black and red led themselves nicely to this pattern.


Using a marled dark navy blue and black cotlin yarn brings out the texture of the weaving draft.

Back to the looms!

Happy Weaving.
Please visit my  Etsy shop  --  Thistle Rose Weaving by clicking here:




Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Twas Twills


To be precise twas Edward Worst's twills that I decided to play with on my newest loom.   Wish I could remember where I bought this colonial blue organic cotton, it weaves up nicely and I adore this color paired with the natural beige warp threads.



This the reverse side of the twill pattern shown above.  I find both sides of this draft equally interesting.  Here I used bleached white cotlin for the weft threads.


A brighter navy blue cotlin yarn was used in this version of the towel.  Can you tell I like blue?

Back to the looms!

Happy Weaving.
Please visit my  Etsy shop  --  Thistle Rose Weaving by clicking here:

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Bright Yarns for Dull Days


Bright, hot chili pepper red warp threads really heat up this turned taquete towel.  Just finished another very long warp of my turned taquete rainbow towels.  


Same warp different look.   This particular version is woven in plain weave at the end of the warp.   I use up most of the left over bobbins that have been used during the course of weaving off this warp.  Nothing worse to me than to have extra half filled bobbins of yarn with no where to go.

Back to the looms!

Happy Weaving.
Please visit my   Etsy shop  --  Thistle Rose Weaving   by clicking here:




Wednesday, January 13, 2016

Out With The Old - In With The Loom


Sunna, my 10 shaft / 12 treadle Glimakra standard countermarch loom that I bought and refurbished last fall has gone on to newer pastures.  Big Swedish countermarch looms will always hold a special place in my heart but they do not agree with my spinal arthritis.  While weaving I need to have my back straight and my feet firmly on the floor, I am not able to do either of those things no matter how adjust my bench height with the Glimakra loom.  Sorry to see my loom go but she did go to a weaver from Wisconsin who was very excited to bring her home.  Happy weaving Sunna!


Here is the photo I looked at while shopping for a new-to-me jack loom.  I was impressed with the beauty of the wood and the apparent newness of this loom.  The loom is an 8 shaft 10 treadle, 46" Schacht Standard Home loom with the matching bench.  If you look closely at the picture you will notice the black nylon beam cord (which I do not like at all).   Bought this loom in Michigan from a weaver's estate.  The loom is 5 years old and has only had one warp go through it's reed.  No scratches, rub marks, dents or damage on either the loom or the bench.  


The Schacht loom newly installed in my weaving studio sporting it's welcome home warp of 3/2 cobalt blue mercerized cotton.  As you can see that yucky nylon beam cord is gone and replaced with brand new texsolv beam cord on both beams.   Ah, so much better and the loom looks much nicer too!  The Schacht loom bench has been replaced with a weaving bench my talented husband made for me, it is the perfect height for me to weave comfortably.



Back view of the Schacht showing the husband-made angel wings holding my lease sticks in the warp.  Looking at the back beam you can see I am using my Glimakra warping sticks to separate the layers of warp.   I am one of those weavers who always names her looms and this loom is no exception, his name is Aidan (a nod to my Irish Roots).  Aidan is my first "boy" loom all the others have been girls.


Thistle Rose, my Gilmore 8 shaft 12 treadle jack loom is currently busy with a towel warp.  Both looms fit my weaving style and weaving life with ease. As you can see if I move the Eden Pure heater from between the looms I still have room for one more loom (be still my heart)!  Saving my pennies for a Gilmore Gem II to add to the herd.  Hoping to add the Gem sometime in the fall - it all depends on how fast I can save up the money to buy her.  

January has been eventful here in my studio for which I am very grateful.  Two sturdy nice jack looms that will keep me weaving far into the future.  Bliss - pure - Bliss.

Back to the looms!

Happy Weaving.
Please visit my   Etsy shop  --  Thistle Rose Weaving   by clicking here:







Tuesday, January 12, 2016

Winter Days At The Loom



Winter sunshine has been rare around here this January and when it does show up I try to get in some photography time.  Love the way the candlestick's shadow looks against the dark cranberry of my handwoven table runner.  The overshot boarder was woven with some lovely gold sparkly yarn which unfortunately is very hard to capture in pictures.


Twill blocks woven in what I consider a traditional palate of Swedish colors.  The old iron stone maple syrup pitcher is one from my small collection.


Using the same twill block draft and warp I wove up my Blue Willow towels and also managed to weave a nice table runner in this color way.


The end of the twill blocks warp turned into a nice finger tip towel with a nice basic red and white combination of cotlin yarns.

Back to the loom!

Happy Weaving.
Please visit my   Etsy shop  --  Thistle Rose Weaving   by clicking here: